In 2017 Pinheiro Neto Advogados is celebrating its 75th anniversary. On looking back, we are convinced of our strong roots – which allow us to understand our present and look ahead –, while remaining strongly committed to making the future a reality.

“The law firm as we know it in Brazil today was started by Pinheiro who, in founding his own firm, changed the entire concept not only of legal practice, but also of what a lawyer should be like.”

— O Advogado, Rodrigo Leal Rodrigues, 2004

visions ofthe future

We encourage our team to look further
ahead and think about the changes that the
next 75 years will bring to law, legal practice,
and the business environment. We invite you to
browse through these 75 selected thoughts.

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  • JORGE N. F. LOPES JUNIOR
    JORGE N. F. LOPES JUNIOR Partner With us since 2000

    Technology innovations will set the pace of change throughout the world. The next 75 years will bring about drastic changes in the way human and economic relations work, with an increasingly greater role being played by artificial intelligence in every aspect of our daily lives, which will probably have an impact as well on the way we conduct legal work. In this context, it seems to me that our challenge is to stay at the forefront of the change process while also preserving the solid culture that has shaped us and now identifies us as a unique institution. I am sure we are going to make it!

  • MAURO BERENHOLC
    MAURO BERENHOLC Partner With us since 1988

    Technology innovations in the next 75 years will bring greater prosperity and establish closer ties between people, and the law will be an even more valuable tool towards achieving a fairer world.

  • MÁRCIA L. B. GIRALDO
    MÁRCIA L. B. GIRALDO Finances With us since 2001

    Cognitive computing will be elbowing out workers in several areas and may even displace professionals in the legal field, since artificial intelligence will be taking over many of the tasks currently performed by human beings due to its capacity to handle big data to establish patterns, run tests, analyze and assess information to produce a given set of results. The world will be entirely interconnected by sensors and supported by the Internet of Things (IoT). Justice will be served based on a model similar to a blockchain, fostering the setup of a virtual entity that will authenticate truth, reason, cause, effect and penalty, based on a combined jurisdiction made up of billions of correlated proceedings.

  • MARÍLIA DE CARA
    MARÍLIA DE CARA Associate With us since 2004

    Over the next years, we will be seeing the steady automation of several jobs currently performed by lawyers. From due diligence to the preparation of drafts and examination of former court decisions, artificial intelligence will be able to handle more work in less time and at a lower cost. If on the one hand this automation will cloud the perception of work value, on the other, it will help recover the more personal aspect of a client-attorney relationship. Individual values, culture, sensibility and the ability to improvise in the face of new complexities and unpredictabilities will be the new seal of great lawyers. More than just technically skilled professionals, clients will be looking out for people who can show empathy and outperform the robotic analysis of legal issues.

  • RODRIGO PERSONE P. CAMARGO
    RODRIGO PERSONE P. CAMARGO Partner With us since 1996

    The legal market will change considerably over the next years due to the extraordinarily swift advance made by technology in the work we do today. I am convinced that work of excellence such as ours will not be replaced by machines and software, but to remain on the leading edge we must accept the fact that we will have to adjust to this new reality creatively. We must be connected and able to absorb the changes that will most certainly come about, and strive to keep up to date. I am sure that our teamwork culture, the outstanding professionals we have working here, and the values and sound structure we have built will enable us to achieve success during the next 75 years. I truly believe in our collective strength and the agelessness of the firm! This training ship will thus be able to continue to navigate any sea without forfeiting either values or principles.

  • ANTONIO MARTINS
    ANTONIO MARTINS Paralegal With us since 1990

    In Brazil, popular support to state oversight bodies and a breakaway from the current political model. A likely restructuring of the country in pursuit of unicity. Advancement in education, entrepreneurship and philanthropy. A focus on combined efforts.

  • CARLOS HENRIQUE TRANJAN BECHARA
    CARLOS HENRIQUE TRANJAN BECHARA Partner With us since 1990

    In the next 75 years, the trend of living in an even more globalized business world will be confirmed. It will therefore be increasingly more important to train our professionals for high-level performance in this borderless world.

    I also guess that well-respected, full-service firms, with a strong reputation such as Pinheiro Neto Advogados, will carry greater weight in providing legal services than legal professionals working alone, however brilliant.

    We will face a reality of burgeoning information technology. Robotization is quickly moving in to the legal world and our challenge will be to administer these more modern tools wisely so that we can maintain the style and high-level service we offer to our clients. But the fact is that we will become more and more dependent on technology to carry out our daily routines.

    On another front, I believe that in the next 75 years, new autonomous studies will be emerging in the field of law, which students at universities may specialize in, especially those connected to the brand new virtual era that is currently being ushered in.

  • JOÃO MARCELO PACHECO
    JOÃO MARCELO PACHECO Partner With us since 1998

    I am an optimist and believe that Brazil will have overcome its major difficulties and made significant headway on the road to social and economic development. We will be living in an increasingly connected world, in which agility will be a must, no longer a plus. We should be ready to deal with the new players that will be arriving by the dozen, all having the skills to work in this very dynamic area. Our pioneer spirit and excellence will continue to set us apart, but it is our ability to foresee and address challenges that will secure the prominent position we have conquered. We have to prepare for each day. We cannot lay back. We have to treasure the people who work here and keep our DNA strong. Our corporate culture is our best stronghold.

  • CAIO FERREIRA SILVA
    CAIO FERREIRA SILVA Partner With us since 2001

    Ius est ars boni et aequi (The law is the art of goodness and equity). No matter how anachronic to quote this Latin principle may seem in this interesting exercise of futurology, Celso’s definition, extracted from the book of Ulpian to the Digest (D. 1,1,1) is incredibly timely and particularly suitable for this analysis. After all, it is towards this same longstanding art of goodness and equity that the law, legal practice and the law firm tend to converge. The next 75 years will witness this and will more clearly reveal a new Rubicon which we are already crossing due to the leading role played now – and even more forcefully in the future – by access to information in the relations between the law, the lawyers and the clients. In this context, the technique-art binomial, which traditionally characterized and defined legal science (in general) and the law (in particular), will see a complete revamping of its stable balance over the next centuries. With the unrestrainable and exponential advancement of technology in all areas connected with law and the legal profession, legal technique and the entire treasure trove of knowledge linked to it will no longer be a predicate of a good law firm or lawyer, to become a premise of any person who applies the law or performs legal work, resulting in the mandatory commoditization of much of the work we are assigned today by clients of various different profiles and field of business. As a result, it will be the art aspect – rather than technique – the fundamental trait that will set a lawyer of the future apart from his or her peers, and provide the competitive edge without which lawyers and law firms will perish in a progressively more demanding, selective, convergent, dynamic, objective, efficient and rational market. The pressure for increasingly lower costs and exceptionally better results will eliminate the commoditized work from the list of fee-based jobs performed by both large and smaller firms, since it will be available to all for free, upon just a few clicks and in almost real time. With the end of the asymmetry of information that nurtures legal practices around the world, what is left? The lawyer. It is in this changing and challenging scenario that to reinvent the way a law firm, and also a lawyer, does business is imperative, at least by those who intend to continue to do what they are doing and live off it. Art in legal practice will become meshed with the ability of the law firms and lawyers to add value to even larger, more sophisticated and complex projects and demands, with answers that besides skill, will also require cunning, originality, creativity, talent, perception and experience, all qualities that technology has so far been unable to mimic or satisfactorily replicate. This is the most striking and arcane facet of the art of practicing law. A good law firm or a good lawyer will be the one that can deliver innovations, solutions and paths which the algorithms and processes that technology can provide at low (or no) cost in real time will be unable to provide. Excellence in a stratified and, consequently, homogeneous market will be the new and perhaps the single product that current avant-garde law firms and professionals will have to offer. And they will be able to charge high prices for that, since the demand and supply laws have apparently not changed since the world began. In short, almost everything will change, except what is essential. What is essential in our profession is that it will continue to depend on our ability to re(invent) ourselves and re(discover) new roads in situations that are increasingly unsteady, sophisticated and complex, where technique alone no longer suffices. It is then that the agelong art of goodness and equity used by the Romans to define law since ancient time will prevail. And those that master this ancient and refined art will certainly have a glorious and prosperous story to tell over the next 75 years.

  • LIGIA SAFRA
    LIGIA SAFRA Associate With us since 2011

    Although lawyers are in general reluctant to change (especially technological change), I believe the impact will be so disruptive that we will be left with no other choice. And by disruptive I do not mean anything negative. I imagine that these new technologies will render our work more efficient and results-oriented.

  • TÉRCIO CHIAVASSA
    TÉRCIO CHIAVASSA Partner With us since 1993

    Brazil will be a different nation, quite distinct from that which we hear about today during reports on the Car Wash Operation. The country as it is today will only be registered in history books and our children and grandchildren will be living in a place that is serious-minded, ethical and ready to take on the challenges of the 22nd century. Legal services may well be partly commoditized, but nothing will replace creativity – a fundamental characteristic of the profession, which has always distinguished Pinheiro Neto personnel in the drive for value-added solutions to clients’ businesses. Nonetheless, we must be prepared to adjust. Just as Pinheiro was ahead of his time and believed in the timelessness of the firm, we must look out for these changes and their impacts so that we can now guarantee a solid structure for future generations. Our challenge will be to maintain the corporate culture, the Pinheiro Neto DNA, which highlights the strength of the group as a whole, independently of our individualities. If we are able to achieve this – and I believe we are – we will certainly guarantee our lead position in a completely remodeled Brazilian legal scenario, with its new challenges and work opportunities.

  • BEATRIZ ARAUJO PYRRHO
    BEATRIZ ARAUJO PYRRHO Associate With us since 2014

    Because the Judiciary has currently reached a point of saturation and those under its jurisdiction are becoming less and less satisfied with the sluggishness and red tape entrenched in the system, I believe that 75 years from now alternative dispute resolution mechanisms shall have been largely disseminated and in full bloom. Since the law and the Judiciary have not proved sufficient to ensure efficient and timely justice, society will turn to seeking autonomy and no longer delegate to third parties (in general a judge) the power to resolve its problems, undertaking to find its own solutions instead. And it is in this scenario that I believe mediation will grow stronger and become part of our culture, given that it is buttressed on the autonomous intent of the parties and enables those involved to play a part in resolving their conflicts. As mediation is to be quick, informal and confidential, it will stir up the interest of clients operating in a wide range of businesses, and foster business, commercial, international and environmental negotiations, among other things. Hence, I hold that in the future mediation will be mandatorily included in the different university graduation courses (together with digital law, which will also be among those in great demand). Therefore, Pinheiro Neto should not only continue to provide arbitration and litigation services, but should spearhead this field of law and set up its own Mediation Chamber, which if properly structured as of now, will be the most reputed in Brazil.

  • DIÓGENES GONÇALVES
    DIÓGENES GONÇALVES Partner With us since 1992

    The weather forecast for rain on the weekend will be accurate. Paper money and coins will be collection and museum items. Renewable energy will prevail. Printers will no longer print petitions, but rather human organs. Some people will live in a virtual realm rather than in a material realm. People will wonder whether they should stop working when they are 90 or 100 years old, considering that the life expectancy will be 130 years, and will have gotten used to the fact that government will not look after them. The world will be more resilient to crises due to personal reserves and insurance mostly adjustable to every stage of life, but crises will be more common and recurrent in a hectic world. Artificial intelligence will replace ordinary processes, but we will continue to play our human role passionately and intuitively. The person who wrote this thought will be alive and healthy, although he did not expect to be so when he typed it on a keyboard, which by the way will no longer exist.

  • JOSÉ LUIZ HOMEM DE MELLO
    JOSÉ LUIZ HOMEM DE MELLO Partner With us since 1992

    It will be the world of artificial intelligence. The Internet of Things, cooperation. A lawyer-less world? Knowledge is largely disseminated and not available to just a few persons. It is not knowledge itself that will set us apart; it is our capacity through teamwork to analyze, digest, condense and express our opinions so as to add value to our clients’ legal challenges. It is a world of attitude. We have an incredibly seasoned and cohesive team. Planning, dedication and high-quality delivery of nontrivial matters will make the essential difference in the next 75 years. We must therefore attract and retain the best talents having a wide range of beliefs. I have always been fond of simple solutions. They seem easy, but may turn out to be very complex. Our clients require agility, efficiency, simplicity and a lot of work. We need to increasingly deepen our ties with them: to share, relax and sometimes even suffer together. Their concerns are our concerns. Their business is our business. Their success is our success. What is great about Pinheiro Neto is that we are always looking ahead. We candidly tell interns that they will be the partners who will one day run the company. Everyone is well treated here, legal and administrative staff. Our business is made up of people. Of meritocracy and a lot of hard work. It is our goal to always hand over to the newcomers a company in better shape than we received it.

  • FERNANDO MIRANDEZ DEL NERO GOMES
    FERNANDO MIRANDEZ DEL NERO GOMES Partner With us since 2002

    There has been a lot of talk about the role of technology and artificial intelligence in legal practice and about lawyers becoming a thing of the past. During the next 75 years, our firm’s challenge will be to show how the work of a lawyer is irreplaceable. Even though technology does evolve at a fast clip, legal practice also continues to become more and more sophisticated. In this regard, Pinheiro Neto Advogados’ tradition and strong culture paradoxically make it the ideal environment for innovations to emerge with the lawyer at the center stage and better equipped with the tools required to operate in an increasingly more complex scenario. Pinheiro Neto will remain a fertile ground for innovation. Innovations in new areas: client relations, new services, new solicitation and engagement mechanisms, personnel management and, especially, in the contemporary application of classic concepts. To integrate technology into our practice (in all areas) and develop as a firm in this new era will help shape our success. It is only on a solid foundation that one can safely innovate and this is certainly engrained within our DNA, which is and will continue to be a pioneering firm made of people. People increasingly prepared and better equipped to address the challenges ahead and to abide by our values.

  • RICARDO BINNIE
    RICARDO BINNIE Associate With us since 2003

    “More for less” client expectations, the use of disruptive technologies and a greater flexibility in the legal service market are the challenges that will shape the legal profession in the coming 75 years. The key strategy to face these challenges and achieve success is simple: tomorrow’s lawyer must create connections and synergies with tomorrow’s client, and work with greater efficiency, flexibility and cooperation.

  • ANDRESSA BENEDETTI
    ANDRESSA BENEDETTI Associate With us since 2015

    Brazilian society will successfully follow the path it has started down to become fairer, more honest and egalitarian. I believe that in the next 75 years social inequalities will decrease sharply and there will be opportunities for education and professional growth across the board. Company management, including in the legal business, will portray the plurality of Brazilian society, with a greater number of women, Afro-Brazilians and members of other social minorities participating through their own efforts and merit. With respect to law studies, I believe that greater value will be afforded to ethical and moral principles and those who graduate will have greater awareness of the fundamental role they will be playing in transforming our society.

  • FRANCO MUSETTI GROTTI
    FRANCO MUSETTI GROTTI Partner With us since 1995

    The world will be very different in the coming 75 years – technology will be even more present, and the activities currently carried out by humans will be completely taken on by computers (artificial intelligence; driverless cars, etc). People will probably live a lot longer due to advances in the medical and biotechnology fields; concepts and habits will be modified (big data). In this new horizon, the work performed by law firms will also change dramatically. If on the one hand technology will make it easier to access surveys, researches, templates and precedents, emerging problems and issues will also be more complex, requiring a greater analytical capacity and creativity on the part of lawyers. In other words, the type of work required by the client will be different. At any rate, a strong corporate culture, dedicated efforts to deliver work of excellence, and a commitment to the client will always be considered valuable assets of fundamental importance to a cutting-edge and reputed law firm. Fortunately, Pinheiro Neto has upheld these values – and I believe it will continue to do so – throughout its history. Bring on the next 75 years!

  • JOSÉ CARLOS JUNQUEIRA SAMPAIO MEIRELLES
    JOSÉ CARLOS JUNQUEIRA SAMPAIO MEIRELLES Partner With us since 1984

    At the speed things are currently changing, I am certain that the world will be very different in the next 75 years. When I first joined the firm more than 30 years ago, we had typewriters, we dreamt of having a fax machine, we still wrote letters to clients and contracts were sent by telex! Today, with the internet, cell phones and all the technology innovations, everything I once experienced now seems prehistoric. I am sure there are a great many technology revolutions still to come and all that we have now will have become outdated and obsolete. But the important things will not change: the pleasure to work in the best firm in Brazil; to enjoy our fellow workers, who at the end of the day are our true friends; to be able to innovate, create and do different things every day; to grow both as a professional and as a person; to work in an ethical and professional environment (and lay my head on the pillow and sleep peacefully), which at the same time offers companionship and loyalty. The essential, deeply rooted things will be the same, however different they may seem. These are the things that ought to guarantee that Pinheiro Neto will continue to be the best law firm in Brazil for many, many years.

  • PEDRO PAULO BARRADAS BARATA
    PEDRO PAULO BARRADAS BARATA Partner With us since 2000

    I foresee a greater concern for the environment, a pursuit of alternative sources of energy, growth, economic integration and expanding urbanization in the country. Artificial intelligence will further develop and become more accessible, with reflections in our personal lives and in the labor market. Many of today’s types of jobs and ways of working will vanish. Human labor will likely become increasingly more creative and sophisticated.

  • MARCELLO BERNARDES
    MARCELLO BERNARDES Partner With us since 1984

    In the next 75 years, we shall have a more serious-minded, ethical and committed country, and all our shortcomings shall have been resolved. A country that will be investing in the education of the upcoming generations, prizing correctness and punishing bad practices.

  • TATIANA DRATOVSKY SISTER
    TATIANA DRATOVSKY SISTER Associate With us since 2002

    I imagine that the legal environment will have less red tape and be more dynamic. Most likely, the tasks requiring less human intellectual intervention will have been mostly automated. The lawyer will therefore need to have the skills and credentials, good sense and emotional intelligence to perform those tasks no machine can do.

  • SÉRGIO AUGUSTO GODINES
    SÉRGIO AUGUSTO GODINES Human Resources With us since 1997

    The city will be clean, and garbage will be all treated and recycled. Our rivers will be brought back to life. Ethics will be a basic attribute, no longer serving to set anyone apart.

  • LUCIANA MAYUMI SAKAMOTO
    LUCIANA MAYUMI SAKAMOTO Associate With us since 2006

    As artificial intelligence gains ground, I believe there will be databases with studies and statistics related to the success of certain legal stands. I do not believe lawyers or judges will be replaced by robots, but an app or software may be put in place to analyze the likelihood of success in recurrent subjects. This would be useful for lawyers and principally for judges, who will be able to check past rulings from the courts in a more objective manner.

  • VICTOR MACENA
    VICTOR MACENA Intern With us since 2016

    I believe that technology developments will reduce the need of human work, including in legal services. Proof of this is the creation of the “AI lawyer” who analyses millions of files at a fast clip, makes decisions and gives suggestions on how the human lawyer should act in the case in question.

  • RAPHAEL DE CUNTO
    RAPHAEL DE CUNTO Partner With us since 1984

    For quite some time now, I have had the honor of playing an active role in the training initiatives of Pinheiro Neto Advogados – a challenging and rewarding task – and, in particular, the launch of our Professional Development Program. Few things compare to the pleasure of witnessing the development of our staff from their first steps as an intern up to becoming a full-fledged equity partner.

    Law schools are currently faced with a pressing issue: how to modernize their programs to attract and retain students from the new generations?

    Looking ahead, their programs must be adapted to the current needs of legal professionals. The basic subjects must still be there, but students must also learn about the fields of law and areas of practice that have emerged over the last decades, such as digital law and environmental law. The social role of lawyers and pro bono legal work should also be discussed at law schools.

    The future of legal practice also calls for full revamp of the teaching methods. There is no longer any room for expository classes where students are not enticed to play an active part in their learning process. Attorneys must be capable of clearly expressing and defending their ideas and opinions.

    And how can large firms contribute to this process? I can doubtless say that the work environment should be viewed as a learning and training center acting in association with the school environment, by offering living examples of problems and client needs that interns and young lawyers have an opportunity to tackle. But nothing takes the place of academia as a major venue for intellectual debates.

    At our firm, we have an opportunity to invest further in our professionals by providing them with expert knowledge as well as with the requisite skills and abilities to express themselves and put their knowledge into practice, such being ingrained in our firm’s culture. This requires careful mentoring by senior professionals; access to bespoke courses administered in-house; and incentives to engage in master’s degree and foreign associate programs abroad. We make a point of exposing our young lawyers to complex and sophisticated legal issues early on.

    Reading what I wrote above, I take even more pride of the role Pinheiro Neto Advogados has long played in the legal community, and which will certainly continue to play in the years ahead: that of being a training ship.

  • ANNA THEREZA MONTEIRO DE BARROS
    ANNA THEREZA MONTEIRO DE BARROS Partner With us since 1994

    Drawn-out litigation cases will be a thing of the past. All lawyers will study negotiation, mediation and non-violent communication techniques. Collaborative law practice will be the rule.

  • FERNANDO ZORZO
    FERNANDO ZORZO Partner With us since 1998

    I joined Pinheiro Neto in 1998, and in the last 19 years have seen constant changes in our practice and, particularly, in our firm. We have repeatedly changed to keep abreast of developments in the outside world. I am certain that we acted as pioneers and spearheads in many of these changes. The changes resulting from technology evolution were staggering. We always were up-to-date on technology in order to continue to provide the best and more efficient services to our clients. However, the most important changes were those related to conduct and behavior. We have an ongoing concern about having the best work environment, encouraging camaraderie, respect and admiration. This environment provides us with the proper balance between work and private interests, helps fight prejudice of all kinds, and addresses the challenges of gender equality, which makes us and our clients proud. I am sure that in the next 75 years we will continue to focus on caring for our most treasured asset: people. And may this stand have effects outside the firm, on the services we provide, and on the perception our clients have of our culture.

  • ANTONIO MORELLO
    ANTONIO MORELLO Partner With us since 1986

    Technology advancement will change everything related to the legal world. From the teaching of law to the legal market, with an important influence on communication, on the interaction between persons and on the manner in which they work, as we are already witnessing today. Long-distance teaching, videoconferences, digital proceedings, digital signature. There are already many changes underway and others yet to come, especially in terms of access to knowledge, with a direct impact on the provision of legal services. Today, knowledge is no longer a privilege granted to few. Knowledge will be increasingly accessible to all. This will call for attention to changes and to the new and, particularly, to the need of taking a forwarding-looking approach in order not to be left behind. Good part of the work currently performed by legal professionals will be done by computers, especially as artificial intelligence gains momentum, with computer programs capable of conducting research or preparing contracts or petitions according to certain parameters determined by the user. A great challenge will be to identify the best way of using machines in favor of man.

  • KAREN SCHIAVON
    KAREN SCHIAVON Associate With us since 2000

    I believe that creativity will be increasingly important for lawyers to meet clients’ needs in the future. With new technologies, scientific innovations and the digital era, our reality and business environment will be increasingly apart from our legislation, under which changes are difficult to approve and which has a maze of rules, many of them absolutely outdated and obsolete. Within this context, the legal professional will be required to understand the principles governing each field of the law and apply them to the new deals and transactions proposed by clients but not covered or encompassed by current rules. It will be basically like solving a puzzle, and only those professionals who are on a continuous retraining process will succeed in this endeavor.

  • MARGARETE BUZO
    MARGARETE BUZO Secretary With us since 2001

    Pinheiro Neto Advogados will be more than just one of the largest law firms in Latin America to become a professional education venue – The Model Law Practice School.

  • ROSELIANE ANDRADE
    ROSELIANE ANDRADE Information Technology With us since 2010

    I believe the whole work flow tends to go paper-free. Today we work only with programmed systems. In the next years we will work with cognitive systems and unstructured data (voice, text, videos, photos and digitalized documents), which will change the way that research, investigations, audits and contract reviews are carried out. I also believe Jurimetrics will be used more often, as it will help measure, for instance, the percentage of decisions issued by the court in a certain direction.

  • CRISTIANNE ZARZUR
    CRISTIANNE ZARZUR Partner With us since 1992

    Human relations have changed and will continue to change at a fast pace in the years ahead. Artificial intelligence, virtual communication and networks, mind-blowing technology developments will require the profession – which is built by persons – to reinvent itself. Something that does not divert from its strictly personal nature but is capable of making use of the best innovations.

  • LUCIANO GARCIA ROSSI
    LUCIANO GARCIA ROSSI Partner With us since 1991

    Our market will face strong international competition. Several players will perish. Intellectual work will increasingly take the spotlight, and there will be no room for repetitive or routine work. In general, legal fees will be lower. Hefty fees will be acceptable only when the client perceives actual gains or value added to the business. Private universities, which are more up-to-date, will distance themselves from public universities, which will lose their status. Students will have more international experience. Brazil will finally end its geographical isolation. I believe new areas in the study and practice of the law will be developed. Specific software will be tasked with due diligence work. We will no longer have one single head office in São Paulo but rather several offices in the city, with meeting rooms spread out in strategic places. Trainees will be required to have international experience and speak foreign languages, which will make competition for a trainee position harder. Diversity will be greater and more easily accepted. We will manage to institutionalize the firm, bringing it in line with international standards. The flexibility of labor laws will allow us to create alternative forms of contracting (part-time, academics as consultants, remote work, etc.). Who knows, the firm may even have active members working in other cities, states or countries?

  • RODRIGO MARTONE
    RODRIGO MARTONE Partner With us since 1999

    The legal profession will become even more sophisticated, and only firms which understand this transformation will continue to grow. Technology advances will reduce the need of physical presence at meetings, and litigation procedural acts will all be performed virtually. Home office will be the rule rather than the exception. People will be free to plan their working hours in delivering their work and assignments. Formal dress will be definitively replaced by casual dress.

  • MARCOS CHAVES LADEIRA
    MARCOS CHAVES LADEIRA Partner With us since 1985

    I believe there will be intense and diversified changes, well beyond what we can even imagine now. These changes will certainly have a strong impact on the way we work and live, but I am certain those working here will be prepared to carry “the firm’s DNA”, so that Pinheiro Neto Advogados may continue to be a stronghold of good legal practices, embracing the best technique in a manner that is socially responsible and committed to its surroundings and community. I quite fancy the idea that we will leave a legacy to Brazilian society through our firm position on the most diverse causes and through our pro bono practice, always in line with the values and principles embraced by the firm throughout the last 75 years.

  • JOSÉ MAURO MACHADO
    JOSÉ MAURO MACHADO Partner With us since 1997

    Our profession will undergo deep changes as technology is increasingly applied to routine activities. Simple and mechanical tasks will be replaced by programs capable of compiling information and writing documents. However, lawyers will always be necessary when it comes to eminently intellectual activities. The physical office space will become irrelevant. The upside will be more flexibility; the downside will be the difficulty in maintaining the same culture and uniformity in our legal services. We will have to worry about international and not only local competitors, which will require focusing on quality and conformity to international levels of excellence. There will be more diversity, as a result of society itself, and formal strictness (in all aspects) will tend to lose ground. The level of specialization seen in law practice in recent years will certainly increase. The business environment will likely be more transparent and ethical, opening room for investments and for social and economic development. The firm has taken an active role in building the country in the last decades, and will most certainly have an important role in the decades to come. Our greatest challenge will be to reinvent ourselves, to adjust to the new reality and maintain an innovative position, which has actually made us one of the most admired law firms in Brazil and worldwide.

  • MARCELO AVANCINI NETO
    MARCELO AVANCINI NETO Partner With us since 1983

    Our Pinheiros River will finally have clear waters. Our offices will go back to the downtown area in São Paulo, which will be again the city’s most important corporate area. We will celebrate the 500 partners’ milestone. And 500 female partners! 3D hologram meetings will be commonplace – unfortunately, without cheese balls. Those who are here today will remain together: at the firm’s memorial.

  • TIAGO MOREIRA VIEIRA ROCHA
    TIAGO MOREIRA VIEIRA ROCHA Associado With us since 2005

    Artificial intelligence will outperform humans in tasks traditionally associated with intellectual skills. Computers will be capable of learning and interpreting an infinite amount of information at an unimaginable speed. The greatest change in the legal market will possibly be the replacement of several roles currently played by lawyers with high performance servers. I dare less in predicting and propose more discussions. Let us think together: will computers be able to resolve conflicts more efficiently? Will the servers interpret the facts and apply tax rules more effectively, with a narrower margin for human interpretation and disputes? Will review of antitrust and environmental matters be replaced by algorithms? Will a law firm comprise legal professionals and physical science professionals? Will we fight for space in the market with legal startups? Or will we join them and follow up closely on this market movement? Is the future of large law firms to be a startup consolidator and integrate the technology solutions with legal expertise? Or will the startups attract all good professionals in the legal market by paying the highest salaries? When should we start investing in research and technology, developing our own systems and algorithms? Who are the right professionals to conduct this process?

  • NATASHA GOLIK
    NATASHA GOLIK Human Resources With us since 2015

    75 years from now we will witness a considerable change in the way we work. Employment relations under the strict labor rules currently in force will lose ground to piecework. I am not sure this would work out fine at our firm, but it could perhaps influence how cases are assigned to lawyers. As I see it, this trend is also related to the desire and need for better quality of life and a balance between professional and private life. The piecework mode gives the professional more independence in dealing with his compensation and his agenda.

  • MARIA APARECIDA ELIAS DA SILVA
    MARIA APARECIDA ELIAS DA SILVA Finances With us since 2014

    75 years from now companies will be closer to neighborhoods. Traffic will make fast commuting impossible. In the pursuit for quality of life, working hours will be increasingly flexible, and work from home will be reality in all segments and areas of activity. The media, in partnership with the State, will have to address environmental matters head on so that the population may breathe some quality air. Water saving will become more and more necessary. Another important measure will be the incentives given to companies to move to smaller towns, to regions such as the Northeast, the North and even smaller towns in other large Brazilian states. The city of São Paulo in particular will not be able to provide living conditions for so many people. Increasingly advanced technology – which, while connecting millions of Brazilians, eliminates the simplest relationships, such as a good conversation, the physical presence – will need to be closely observed, and school programs will have to be created to avoid that, in time, people eventually lose the ability to express themselves, even with family members, without the “intermediation” of technology. The tech addiction, which already affects us all, helps explain the emergence of projects such as “log off and get a life.”

  • FRANCISCO WERNECK MARANHÃO
    FRANCISCO WERNECK MARANHÃO Partner With us since 1996

    A considerable part of legal services will be provided with the assistance of technology, and several tasks currently performed by lawyers will be carried out by machines. The corporate lawyer will act as a trusted business advisor, leaving behind the traditional role of a person who focuses exclusively on legal matters without looking at the bigger picture.

  • ANTONIO JOSÉ L.C. MONTEIRO
    ANTONIO JOSÉ L.C. MONTEIRO Partner With us since 1979

    We will live in the culture of everything is possible, where creativity and simplicity will be the great strengths. Diversity will prevail and the world will be composed of millions of different cultural tribes, with different habits, different coexistence rules, and different ethical standards. In my opinion, the concept of globalization will take on a new meaning. The legal market will shift to strictly personal services – the lawyer as the client’s personal advisor and faithful squire. It will be the return of the “family doctor.”

  • GABRIELLA COCIOLITO GARCIA
    GABRIELLA COCIOLITO GARCIA Associate With us since 2013

    I believe that 75 years from now the firm’s professionals will have different characteristics. The new generation has a greater need to change and to look for new challenges. The current context and career possibilities will need to be adjusted to this dynamic world so that ‘tradition’ may live on in an all-new scenario.

  • IVAN THIBES
    IVAN THIBES Paralegal With us since 1994

    Pinheiro Neto will have new branches. Some of them abroad. The number of lawyers and partners will increase and the head office will move on again to a new and more modern building. Work will be almost paperless as most of it will be performed electronically, especially follow-up on court proceedings. The firm will have more and more a younger spirit without denting its serious commitment to its clients. It may even adopt casual dress throughout the week!

  • GABRIELA CAVAZANI
    GABRIELA CAVAZANI Associate With us since 2012

    I am sure that law practice will be less formal in the years to come. We will save time and make better use of digital resources, expediting the court relief sought in legal proceedings.

  • MARCELO MARQUES RONCAGLIA
    MARCELO MARQUES RONCAGLIA Partner With us since 1995

    I imagine a future in which legal rules from all countries will tend to harmonize. As to sovereignty, legal systems will converge on multiple points to facilitate business trade. Although not a fostering agent, the law will not be an obstacle to doing business. Technology will be a game changer in terms of legal studies and legal practice. There will be important efficiency gains. Great opportunities will arise as new areas will be created to meet the requirements of a very demanding society when it comes to responsibility, accountability and transparency. Legal studies will be increasingly humanized. The by-the-book approach to the law will give way to reviews more connected to the social and economic context. The rule must make sense not only to the legal scholar but also to the ordinary citizen.

  • MARCELLO LOBO
    MARCELLO LOBO Partner With us since 1998

    Today information is superficial, aimed at the masses, poorly developed, pondered or discussed. We live in an era of individualism, competition, exclusion, and unenlightened self-interest. It remains to be seen whether these features will be intensified or whether we will have more esprit de corps, altruism, sharing and cooperation in the next 75 years. The law seeks social peace, and peace may be attained by either of two paths: litigation or dialogue. Lawyers must maintain their ability to ponder, consider and test alternatives – to see the other side, to favor dialogue, and to build bridges through reason. A lawyer cannot get involved in “bandwagon effects,” polarization or oversimplification.

  • ALEXANDRE OUTEDA JORGE
    ALEXANDRE OUTEDA JORGE Partner With us since 1997

    There will be much more intolerance for waste of natural resources and for pollution in its many forms. There will be an increase in medical, transportation and data technology. There will be fewer opportunities for less skilled persons and, as a consequence, greater unemployment. In the legal field, greater need for specialization and replacement of many activities by computers and technology. Mass litigation and due diligence will no longer exist.

  • JOÃO LUÍS A. DE MEDEIROS
    JOÃO LUÍS A. DE MEDEIROS Partner With us since 1984

    Global enterprises tend to consolidate under the aegis of international rules. Taxes, businesses and proceedings will dissociate from the countries in which they occur and will be governed by rules (or practices) of a general nature, not guided by the specific legal provisions of each country involved. Companies will be required to know and equally observe such rules, but will have some leeway to create their own control and management routines and procedures. There will be many obstacles ahead, but the firm’s path has been well structured through the incentives to international education given to our professionals. The paradox will be to reconcile the knowledge on international rules and principles with knowledge about the specificities of each company. It seems to me that the profile of law professionals in the decades ahead will be equally complex. Some time ago, the discussion was whether one was a generalist or a specialist. Up to now it has been possible to have professionals with both profiles. The trend, it seems to me, is to have a provider of legal services with comprehensive knowledge of a specific matter. It is unlikely that we will find an Hercules-type lawyer – a litigation lawyer knowledgeable about legal procedure and, depending on the case, about due diligence, capital market, corporate law, arbitration, consumer law, and so on. There will be a trend toward integration of specializations.

  • EDUARDO CARVALHO CAIUBY
    EDUARDO CARVALHO CAIUBY Partner With us since 1988

    Traditional law practice, attached to paper, to physical procedure and to formalism, will tend to disappear. Forms of dispute resolution other than the Judiciary will be more present in the lives of people. We will have instantaneous and impersonal mechanisms for preparation of contracts.

  • LUCIANA ROSANOVA GALHARDO
    LUCIANA ROSANOVA GALHARDO Partner With us since 1989

    Technology will be at the service of legal businesses, providing more free time and quality of life. We will be pioneers in virtual businesses, high technology, and work from home.

  • TIAGO THEMUDO LESSA
    TIAGO THEMUDO LESSA Partner With us since 1997

    Artificial intelligence will be at the same time a great competitor and a great ally. We live and will live in times where speed is crucial and response time will be increasingly shorter, but by no means at the expense of quality. Human beings will always be an important part of this process.

  • ADRIANO DRUMMOND CANÇADO TRINDADE
    ADRIANO DRUMMOND CANÇADO TRINDADE Counsel With us since 1995

    Technology developments and the speed of events in Brazil and worldwide will make human beings, their sensitiveness and their creativity even more essential for business and for the legal profession.

  • THAÍS FONTES DRUMOND
    THAÍS FONTES DRUMOND Associate With us since 2013

    Women will be granted equal and proportional participation in leadership positions, also as equity partners in law firms.

  • LUANA MAGALHÃES POLÓNIA
    LUANA MAGALHÃES POLÓNIA Secretary With us since 2017

    I believe that new areas of practice related to technology will arise in legal field. Technology will, in fact, guide the workforce.

  • EDUARDO PAOLIELLO
    EDUARDO PAOLIELLO Partner With us since 2000

    Technology will not only be a means to make our lives easier. We will have to learn to live with this and get the most out of it. After having been the model of governance among law firms in its first 75 years, the firm will be the model of diversity and inclusion in Brazil and Latin America in the next 75 years.

  • LUCAS SIMÃO
    LUCAS SIMÃO Associate With us since 2004

    Society will develop, technology will advance, the climate will change, but the essence will remain intact: human relations will continue to set the tone for everything.

  • JANAINA CAMPOS MESQUITA VAZ
    JANAINA CAMPOS MESQUITA VAZ Associate With us since 2012

    I believe there will be more women holding leadership positions in large law firms.

  • LUIZ FERNANDO PAIVA
    LUIZ FERNANDO PAIVA Partner With us since 1990

    Brazil will be a more ethical country, finding ways to get around will fall into disuse, and taking advantage of everything will no longer be praised. Society will be transformed, people will be proud of delivering on their promises without losing their good humor and their capacity to adjust to adversities and to react to unforeseen events, inherent characteristics of Brazilian culture.

  • HENRY SZTUTMAN
    HENRY SZTUTMAN Partner With us since 1990

    One of the great challenges for our law firm will be to have our clients and other stakeholders, in Brazil and abroad, realize the value of our members’ intellectual vigor – so that lawyers will remain indispensable, deals may be negotiated and closed, and disputes may be well handled and settled – in a scenario in which artificial intelligence will be a constant and indispensable companion as a working tool. Our people must be able to make high-quality human repertoire prevail and make a difference, otherwise we risk having our work performed by machines. Our values and conduct must have the last 75 years as reference, but we must be prepared to belong to a new time, a new world. I believe our members will have a more diversified profile – their education will be more thorough and their technical training more intense. People that will do their best for the firm, that will be committed and accept responsibility and that, in return, will find here institutional incentive to search for balance between work and personal life. Pinheiro Neto must continue being a place of opportunities, which opens its doors for both personal and intellectual development, a place where the best people and the best professionals will wish to be.

  • GIANCARLO MATARAZZO
    GIANCARLO MATARAZZO Partner With us since 1997

    People and demands will change and so will the law practice. Technology will change the dynamics of client-attorney communication in a rather significant way. Competition will be fiercer because information will be public and accessible. What will not change is that complex cases will still need qualified people. The challenge will be to attract and retain such people. Therefore, our policies for Human Resources will be more flexible, and managerial models will be further developed. Our challenge will be to keep union and teamwork.

  • FERNANDO ALVES MEIRA
    FERNANDO ALVES MEIRA Partner With us since 1989

    Areas such as transport, agriculture, communication, and energy will be safer and more efficient. Medicine will find a solution for several chronic diseases. The environment will be handled in a responsible and balanced way. The world will be more integrated and less unequal. Brazil will be able to develop its economic potential and achieve a very high level of justice and social balance in the next 75 years. The country will achieve meaningful strategic importance. The population, in general, will be much better educated and prepared. With more equity, people will be less consumerist and more spiritualized. Interpersonal relationships will be less hostile, friendlier, with wholehearted cooperation. Legal issues will be more and more complex, and the practice niches will be increasingly better defined. Law firms will no longer demand large physical spaces. Remote work will gain momentum. Investments in technology and standardization of procedures will be intensified. Manpower will be much more qualified. Only a handful of law firms will be successful, and competition will be fierce. The great challenge will be to generate quality employments that ensure people personal fulfillment and dependability.

  • MARCELO VIVEIROS DE MOURA
    MARCELO VIVEIROS DE MOURA Partner With us since 1985

    In the next 75 years, a lot of what we currently do will be performed by computers. Our challenge will be to keep on top of what will be difficult for computers to accomplish. Things involving human interaction. Maybe our team will not have as many lawyers, but they will all be technically flawless and feel completely at ease in the business environment. New practice areas will come up, while others will fade away. Let the next 75 years come!

  • ANGELA KUNG
    ANGELA KUNG Partner With us since 1989

    Relations between people will suffer a major change in the next years. Nowadays, we must observe, accept and absorb the changes that technology is imposing on us. On the other hand, this same technology shows, on a daily basis, how much it can help us lead a better life. In my area of legal practice, life sciences, we discuss the innovations that will shape the future. I like to think that, thanks to our work at Pinheiro Neto Advogados, it will be common place for us to talk, in 2092, about a cure for cancer, Alzheimer and chronic diseases.

  • RODRIGO DE MAGALHÃES CARNEIRO DE OLIVEIRA
    RODRIGO DE MAGALHÃES CARNEIRO DE OLIVEIRA Partner With us since 1982

    In the law field, there will be less tolerance for swindles, doubtful clauses and malicious prosecution. Business will be more sophisticated, demanding bespoke multidisciplinary teams. In the production scenario, more developed machines and processes will greatly reduce the demand for low skilled labor – in agriculture, industry and in services. Unemployment will rise and such demand for overspecialization will work against reduction in social inequalities. Sectors and industries that once believed to be fundamental will be put to the test. The automobile industry will lose importance and give way to alternative means of transport. Banks as we know today will have to reinvent themselves to compete with fintechs and e-payment mechanisms. Objects that we currently see as essential will become museum pieces (books, keyboards, hook phones, wristwatches, glasses, etc.). Human relations will change as they become more dependent on social medias; and perceptions, which used to be purely sensorial, will also be adapted to the virtual world.

  • ANDRÉ VIVAN DE SOUZA
    ANDRÉ VIVAN DE SOUZA Partner With us since 2000

    The regulatory scenario will grow increasingly complex to cope with social demands, resulting in the need for more expertise and differentiation in the services rendered. The simpler jobs are doomed to disappear and might be replaced by technology innovations. Law firms will compete not only between themselves but also with other types of services and platforms.

  • SÉRGIO FARINA FILHO
    SÉRGIO FARINA FILHO Partner With us since 1981

    Communications will be faster and decisions, maybe, less pondered. Friendlier mechanisms to solve disputes will be common. In Brazil, justice will be faster and grounded on court precedents. Society will be more sensitive to others, to the environment and to differences. We will see the sovereignty of ethics, influenced by more efficient mechanisms to control corruption. Legal studies will be increasingly global. Exchange programs will be mandatory in school curricula. Women and men will share the work market equally. Our profession will be more valued and legal services will be an accessible tool for citizenship.

  • GUILHERME LEITE
    GUILHERME LEITE Partner With us since 1994

    The law market will be more challenging and sophisticated. Clients will be more dynamic and demanding. The subject matters under our care will be more complex and multifaceted. Our lawyers and trainees will have higher aspirations and greater expectations. We will have to adjust to such changes without giving up our values and ideals. They have brought us here and will help us face the challenges and opportunities in the next 75 years.

  • BRUNO BALDUCCINI
    BRUNO BALDUCCINI Partner With us since 1991

    Fintechs have revolutionized the financial system and paved a road of no return for banks that are willing to remain competitive in the future. They are showing the banking industry that the ‘one size fits all’ approach must be changed. Clients have steadily moved into the spotlight – products and services are now to adapt to their needs.

    The challenge of large banking institutions is to adapt their business model if they want to live up to this new technology-driven reality. Competition increasingly comes from all sides, as clients are now setting the rules.

    Blockchain technology, for instance, has raised ongoing concerns about the need of elements that would make day-to-day transactions more trustworthy, such as client and transaction records, or full-fledged fund transfer mechanisms. Such technology has been extensively tested for issuance of cryptocurrencies, so the trend is that it will be increasingly adopted in the banking system, whose transactions and operations will be faster, safer and cheaper.

    In this digital age, we will see less physical branches (or none at all), and Brazilians being increasingly ‘bankarized’.

    We will no longer ‘go to’ a bank for our financial services, as it will instead start working as a portal where several service providers will be acting under one same umbrella. By doing so, banks will be able to concentrate their efforts on their strengths, leaving secondary services to their business partners.

    And for those asking me whether paper money and coins will exist, I would recommend detachment. Minting coins and printing paper money is expensive, and so is keeping them safe; it seems that they will soon be just a memory.

  • FERNANDO RUIZ DE ALMEIDA PRADO
    FERNANDO RUIZ DE ALMEIDA PRADO Partner With us since 1986

    Legal services will be more objective and dynamic. There will be no room for lack of objectivity. Law firms will be required to have structures that are quickly adapted to society’s changes. Large law firms will be tasked with mass work, increasingly computerized and standardized. Smaller ones will focus on specialized services for clients willing to pay for creativity and imagination, which are notedly responsible for economic transformation. Remote work will take pride of place because of technology developments and the high cost of physical facilities. The members of large law firms will be young people and they will probably retire at the age of 50 to 55, because succession of individuals will be fast as increasingly qualified professionals join the market. Legal education will be better, closer connected to reality and taught in a less theoretical way.

  • GUILHERME SAMPAIO MONTEIRO
    GUILHERME SAMPAIO MONTEIRO Partner With us since 2001

    Technology will increase our productivity, letting us even more connected. On the other hand, it will create new types of competitors. We will need to specialize even more to deliver top-level counseling to our clients. The working environment will be different. Horizontal structures will leave room for greater exchange of ideas and innovation.

  • RENÊ G. S. MEDRADO
    RENÊ G. S. MEDRADO Partner With us since 1995

    When thinking about our law firm in the next 75 years, one of the main aspects that comes to my mind is the matter of knowledge.

    Knowledge is – in essence – one of the main factors that have brought us here. Knowledge is the quality for which we are known and that serves as pillar for the other attributes of support and sustenance, such as ethics, assertive communication, engagement in the cases, the open and aboveboard dealing with clients and peers, among others. These are all qualities that highlight and support our culture. I do not intend to address all of them, but only knowledge.

    In the last 75 years, we have evolved from knowledge management based on records of our hands-on experience and analyses, all of which were kept in folders at the library. It was perhaps the richest part of the library itself in that it synthesized the firm’s problem-solving knowledge and strategies. I recall being there for hours reading, with great curiosity, the yellow copies of memos written by seasoned partners about cases solved, matters discussed or under discussion. The research memos were very important for sure, but the memos reporting how the cases had been solved and the solutions found for factual scenarios were the most precious ones, because they reflected the very raison d’être of the firm, which is not to be an academic powerhouse (although we may even make our contributions) but rather to produce the knowledge necessary for solving factual problems brought by our clients or, ultimately, by society, with regard to corporate law in its broadest sense.

    It is obvious that technology invaded and stirred up such system of recording knowledge and experiences. The output is very fast, cases are many and varied, the recording itself is erratic. Even if they were all there, consulting such records would be difficult because the dynamics of current times does not allow for long consultations carried out standing in the library. Other times, a long time ago. This certainly poses challenges for the next 75 years.

    The path I see is to increasingly invest our time and efforts in “tacit knowledge”, i.e., knowledge that has not been obtained formally, in a systematized way, by means of classic studies and graduation and post-graduation law courses, but rather built as a result of experiences lived along one’s life. During its first 75 years, the firm has built a great deal of tacit knowledge. I believe this is precisely our most valuable asset. It is said that tacit knowledge is what lies below the waterline, should it be an iceberg. The metaphor is valid. It is the kind of knowledge that is only obtainable by scrutinizing, inquiring, asking, so that the holders of a living experience may share their unique knowledge in light of the facts at issue – considering their nuances and differences.

    The tacit knowledge of our firm comprises not only the one held by each one of its members; it is also formed of the sum of the experiences and memories lived jointly, in so many cases. The most brilliant insights have certainly come from bringing distinct experts together. This is how we have made a difference and stood out. Therefore, the question is how can we keep on extracting the best that the members of Pinheiro Neto, as a group, can offer, in terms of added tacit knowledge, so as to solve the complex issues entrusted to us? I have no doubt that the answer lies in greater cooperation and interaction among the members.

    The next 75 years will be marked less by the brilliance of a single lawyer than by the strength of the team he or she belongs to, because knowledge can no longer be monopolized – whether by quantity or by the specialty of a subject. The level of growing complexity in several practice areas since the 1990s is overwhelming. Because nobody will know everything, experts in corporate law will have to interact with the antitrust peers, who will need to understand the issues regarding environmental law, which in turn will depend on the concepts of financial law, which cannot be practiced without tax law, thus generating the need to create permanent networks of knowledge sharing. This will have to be done not only on a case-by-case basis, but forums inside the firm will have to be encouraged, interaction and companionship spaces promoted, to allow more spontaneity aimed at the exchange of knowledge so that solutions may arise not only as a response to the needs and specificities of a case, but may happen at any time.

    Think over the spaces to accomplish that. Think over the teams. Think over the meetings. Even more participation,
    more discussion, more multidisciplinarity, more interaction, more cooperation.

    The future will tell, but these are some issues we must tackle to keep alive, for the next 75 years, this jewel – tacit knowledge –, which is one of the main qualities that support Pinheiro Neto Advogados.

  • ALEXANDRE BERTOLDI
    ALEXANDRE BERTOLDI Managing Partner With us since 1982

    I dare not foresee how our physical space will be like, or even if we will need some physical space at all. I believe the changes brought about by technology will be so profound that it is practically impossible to predict how our profession will be practiced. I do however have two unshakeable convictions: Brazil will be – definitively and inexorably – a major player in the world scenario; and Pinheiro Neto will remain being the best law firm in Brazil (and one of the best in the world), provided that it keeps its policy of investing and believing in the best people, reinforcing the belief in those values that have guided us thus far.

  • Leonardo Rocha e Silva
    Leonardo Rocha e Silva Partner With us since 1994

    As mobile devices, social networking and data search and storage systems improve, we will increasingly invest in computerized technologies and systems to better serve our clients. In order to remain needed, we will share our daily experiences at an even faster pace. To have the most out of the sharing economy model, we will invest more in measures to bring the partners, consultants and other members of our law firm closer together, building a trustworthy and respectful cooperative environment for the benefit of our clients. Further, we will expose ourselves more – both inside and outside the firm – so that our qualities and values may always be noticed.

visions ofthe future

Technology innovations will set the pace of change throughout the world. The next 75 years will bring about drastic changes in the way human and economic relations work, with an increasingly greater role being played by artificial intelligence in every aspect of our daily lives, which will probably have an impact as well on the way we conduct legal work. In this context, it seems to me that our challenge is to stay at the forefront of the change process while also preserving the solid culture that has shaped us and now identifies us as a unique institution. I am sure we are going to make it!

Technology innovations in the next 75 years will bring greater prosperity and establish closer ties between people, and the law will be an even more valuable tool towards achieving a fairer world.

Cognitive computing will be elbowing out workers in several areas and may even displace professionals in the legal field, since artificial intelligence will be taking over many of the tasks currently performed by human beings due to its capacity to handle big data to establish patterns, run tests, analyze and assess information to produce a given set of results. The world will be entirely interconnected by sensors and supported by the Internet of Things (IoT). Justice will be served based on a model similar to a blockchain, fostering the setup of a virtual entity that will authenticate truth, reason, cause, effect and penalty, based on a combined jurisdiction made up of billions of correlated proceedings.

Over the next years, we will be seeing the steady automation of several jobs currently performed by lawyers. From due diligence to the preparation of drafts and examination of former court decisions, artificial intelligence will be able to handle more work in less time and at a lower cost. If on the one hand this automation will cloud the perception of work value, on the other, it will help recover the more personal aspect of a client-attorney relationship. Individual values, culture, sensibility and the ability to improvise in the face of new complexities and unpredictabilities will be the new seal of great lawyers. More than just technically skilled professionals, clients will be looking out for people who can show empathy and outperform the robotic analysis of legal issues.

The legal market will change considerably over the next years due to the extraordinarily swift advance made by technology in the work we do today. I am convinced that work of excellence such as ours will not be replaced by machines and software, but to remain on the leading edge we must accept the fact that we will have to adjust to this new reality creatively. We must be connected and able to absorb the changes that will most certainly come about, and strive to keep up to date. I am sure that our teamwork culture, the outstanding professionals we have working here, and the values and sound structure we have built will enable us to achieve success during the next 75 years. I truly believe in our collective strength and the agelessness of the firm! This training ship will thus be able to continue to navigate any sea without forfeiting either values or principles.

In Brazil, popular support to state oversight bodies and a breakaway from the current political model. A likely restructuring of the country in pursuit of unicity. Advancement in education, entrepreneurship and philanthropy. A focus on combined efforts.

In the next 75 years, the trend of living in an even more globalized business world will be confirmed. It will therefore be increasingly more important to train our professionals for high-level performance in this borderless world.

I also guess that well-respected, full-service firms, with a strong reputation such as Pinheiro Neto Advogados, will carry greater weight in providing legal services than legal professionals working alone, however brilliant.

We will face a reality of burgeoning information technology. Robotization is quickly moving in to the legal world and our challenge will be to administer these more modern tools wisely so that we can maintain the style and high-level service we offer to our clients. But the fact is that we will become more and more dependent on technology to carry out our daily routines.

On another front, I believe that in the next 75 years, new autonomous studies will be emerging in the field of law, which students at universities may specialize in, especially those connected to the brand new virtual era that is currently being ushered in.

I am an optimist and believe that Brazil will have overcome its major difficulties and made significant headway on the road to social and economic development. We will be living in an increasingly connected world, in which agility will be a must, no longer a plus. We should be ready to deal with the new players that will be arriving by the dozen, all having the skills to work in this very dynamic area. Our pioneer spirit and excellence will continue to set us apart, but it is our ability to foresee and address challenges that will secure the prominent position we have conquered. We have to prepare for each day. We cannot lay back. We have to treasure the people who work here and keep our DNA strong. Our corporate culture is our best stronghold.

Ius est ars boni et aequi (The law is the art of goodness and equity). No matter how anachronic to quote this Latin principle may seem in this interesting exercise of futurology, Celso’s definition, extracted from the book of Ulpian to the Digest (D. 1,1,1) is incredibly timely and particularly suitable for this analysis. After all, it is towards this same longstanding art of goodness and equity that the law, legal practice and the law firm tend to converge. The next 75 years will witness this and will more clearly reveal a new Rubicon which we are already crossing due to the leading role played now – and even more forcefully in the future – by access to information in the relations between the law, the lawyers and the clients. In this context, the technique-art binomial, which traditionally characterized and defined legal science (in general) and the law (in particular), will see a complete revamping of its stable balance over the next centuries. With the unrestrainable and exponential advancement of technology in all areas connected with law and the legal profession, legal technique and the entire treasure trove of knowledge linked to it will no longer be a predicate of a good law firm or lawyer, to become a premise of any person who applies the law or performs legal work, resulting in the mandatory commoditization of much of the work we are assigned today by clients of various different profiles and field of business. As a result, it will be the art aspect – rather than technique – the fundamental trait that will set a lawyer of the future apart from his or her peers, and provide the competitive edge without which lawyers and law firms will perish in a progressively more demanding, selective, convergent, dynamic, objective, efficient and rational market. The pressure for increasingly lower costs and exceptionally better results will eliminate the commoditized work from the list of fee-based jobs performed by both large and smaller firms, since it will be available to all for free, upon just a few clicks and in almost real time. With the end of the asymmetry of information that nurtures legal practices around the world, what is left? The lawyer. It is in this changing and challenging scenario that to reinvent the way a law firm, and also a lawyer, does business is imperative, at least by those who intend to continue to do what they are doing and live off it. Art in legal practice will become meshed with the ability of the law firms and lawyers to add value to even larger, more sophisticated and complex projects and demands, with answers that besides skill, will also require cunning, originality, creativity, talent, perception and experience, all qualities that technology has so far been unable to mimic or satisfactorily replicate. This is the most striking and arcane facet of the art of practicing law. A good law firm or a good lawyer will be the one that can deliver innovations, solutions and paths which the algorithms and processes that technology can provide at low (or no) cost in real time will be unable to provide. Excellence in a stratified and, consequently, homogeneous market will be the new and perhaps the single product that current avant-garde law firms and professionals will have to offer. And they will be able to charge high prices for that, since the demand and supply laws have apparently not changed since the world began. In short, almost everything will change, except what is essential. What is essential in our profession is that it will continue to depend on our ability to re(invent) ourselves and re(discover) new roads in situations that are increasingly unsteady, sophisticated and complex, where technique alone no longer suffices. It is then that the agelong art of goodness and equity used by the Romans to define law since ancient time will prevail. And those that master this ancient and refined art will certainly have a glorious and prosperous story to tell over the next 75 years.

Although lawyers are in general reluctant to change (especially technological change), I believe the impact will be so disruptive that we will be left with no other choice. And by disruptive I do not mean anything negative. I imagine that these new technologies will render our work more efficient and results-oriented.

Brazil will be a different nation, quite distinct from that which we hear about today during reports on the Car Wash Operation. The country as it is today will only be registered in history books and our children and grandchildren will be living in a place that is serious-minded, ethical and ready to take on the challenges of the 22nd century. Legal services may well be partly commoditized, but nothing will replace creativity – a fundamental characteristic of the profession, which has always distinguished Pinheiro Neto personnel in the drive for value-added solutions to clients’ businesses. Nonetheless, we must be prepared to adjust. Just as Pinheiro was ahead of his time and believed in the timelessness of the firm, we must look out for these changes and their impacts so that we can now guarantee a solid structure for future generations. Our challenge will be to maintain the corporate culture, the Pinheiro Neto DNA, which highlights the strength of the group as a whole, independently of our individualities. If we are able to achieve this – and I believe we are – we will certainly guarantee our lead position in a completely remodeled Brazilian legal scenario, with its new challenges and work opportunities.

Because the Judiciary has currently reached a point of saturation and those under its jurisdiction are becoming less and less satisfied with the sluggishness and red tape entrenched in the system, I believe that 75 years from now alternative dispute resolution mechanisms shall have been largely disseminated and in full bloom. Since the law and the Judiciary have not proved sufficient to ensure efficient and timely justice, society will turn to seeking autonomy and no longer delegate to third parties (in general a judge) the power to resolve its problems, undertaking to find its own solutions instead. And it is in this scenario that I believe mediation will grow stronger and become part of our culture, given that it is buttressed on the autonomous intent of the parties and enables those involved to play a part in resolving their conflicts. As mediation is to be quick, informal and confidential, it will stir up the interest of clients operating in a wide range of businesses, and foster business, commercial, international and environmental negotiations, among other things. Hence, I hold that in the future mediation will be mandatorily included in the different university graduation courses (together with digital law, which will also be among those in great demand). Therefore, Pinheiro Neto should not only continue to provide arbitration and litigation services, but should spearhead this field of law and set up its own Mediation Chamber, which if properly structured as of now, will be the most reputed in Brazil.

The weather forecast for rain on the weekend will be accurate. Paper money and coins will be collection and museum items. Renewable energy will prevail. Printers will no longer print petitions, but rather human organs. Some people will live in a virtual realm rather than in a material realm. People will wonder whether they should stop working when they are 90 or 100 years old, considering that the life expectancy will be 130 years, and will have gotten used to the fact that government will not look after them. The world will be more resilient to crises due to personal reserves and insurance mostly adjustable to every stage of life, but crises will be more common and recurrent in a hectic world. Artificial intelligence will replace ordinary processes, but we will continue to play our human role passionately and intuitively. The person who wrote this thought will be alive and healthy, although he did not expect to be so when he typed it on a keyboard, which by the way will no longer exist.

It will be the world of artificial intelligence. The Internet of Things, cooperation. A lawyer-less world? Knowledge is largely disseminated and not available to just a few persons. It is not knowledge itself that will set us apart; it is our capacity through teamwork to analyze, digest, condense and express our opinions so as to add value to our clients’ legal challenges. It is a world of attitude. We have an incredibly seasoned and cohesive team. Planning, dedication and high-quality delivery of nontrivial matters will make the essential difference in the next 75 years. We must therefore attract and retain the best talents having a wide range of beliefs. I have always been fond of simple solutions. They seem easy, but may turn out to be very complex. Our clients require agility, efficiency, simplicity and a lot of work. We need to increasingly deepen our ties with them: to share, relax and sometimes even suffer together. Their concerns are our concerns. Their business is our business. Their success is our success. What is great about Pinheiro Neto is that we are always looking ahead. We candidly tell interns that they will be the partners who will one day run the company. Everyone is well treated here, legal and administrative staff. Our business is made up of people. Of meritocracy and a lot of hard work. It is our goal to always hand over to the newcomers a company in better shape than we received it.

There has been a lot of talk about the role of technology and artificial intelligence in legal practice and about lawyers becoming a thing of the past. During the next 75 years, our firm’s challenge will be to show how the work of a lawyer is irreplaceable. Even though technology does evolve at a fast clip, legal practice also continues to become more and more sophisticated. In this regard, Pinheiro Neto Advogados’ tradition and strong culture paradoxically make it the ideal environment for innovations to emerge with the lawyer at the center stage and better equipped with the tools required to operate in an increasingly more complex scenario. Pinheiro Neto will remain a fertile ground for innovation. Innovations in new areas: client relations, new services, new solicitation and engagement mechanisms, personnel management and, especially, in the contemporary application of classic concepts. To integrate technology into our practice (in all areas) and develop as a firm in this new era will help shape our success. It is only on a solid foundation that one can safely innovate and this is certainly engrained within our DNA, which is and will continue to be a pioneering firm made of people. People increasingly prepared and better equipped to address the challenges ahead and to abide by our values.

“More for less” client expectations, the use of disruptive technologies and a greater flexibility in the legal service market are the challenges that will shape the legal profession in the coming 75 years. The key strategy to face these challenges and achieve success is simple: tomorrow’s lawyer must create connections and synergies with tomorrow’s client, and work with greater efficiency, flexibility and cooperation.

Brazilian society will successfully follow the path it has started down to become fairer, more honest and egalitarian. I believe that in the next 75 years social inequalities will decrease sharply and there will be opportunities for education and professional growth across the board. Company management, including in the legal business, will portray the plurality of Brazilian society, with a greater number of women, Afro-Brazilians and members of other social minorities participating through their own efforts and merit. With respect to law studies, I believe that greater value will be afforded to ethical and moral principles and those who graduate will have greater awareness of the fundamental role they will be playing in transforming our society.

The world will be very different in the coming 75 years – technology will be even more present, and the activities currently carried out by humans will be completely taken on by computers (artificial intelligence; driverless cars, etc). People will probably live a lot longer due to advances in the medical and biotechnology fields; concepts and habits will be modified (big data). In this new horizon, the work performed by law firms will also change dramatically. If on the one hand technology will make it easier to access surveys, researches, templates and precedents, emerging problems and issues will also be more complex, requiring a greater analytical capacity and creativity on the part of lawyers. In other words, the type of work required by the client will be different. At any rate, a strong corporate culture, dedicated efforts to deliver work of excellence, and a commitment to the client will always be considered valuable assets of fundamental importance to a cutting-edge and reputed law firm. Fortunately, Pinheiro Neto has upheld these values – and I believe it will continue to do so – throughout its history. Bring on the next 75 years!

At the speed things are currently changing, I am certain that the world will be very different in the next 75 years. When I first joined the firm more than 30 years ago, we had typewriters, we dreamt of having a fax machine, we still wrote letters to clients and contracts were sent by telex! Today, with the internet, cell phones and all the technology innovations, everything I once experienced now seems prehistoric. I am sure there are a great many technology revolutions still to come and all that we have now will have become outdated and obsolete. But the important things will not change: the pleasure to work in the best firm in Brazil; to enjoy our fellow workers, who at the end of the day are our true friends; to be able to innovate, create and do different things every day; to grow both as a professional and as a person; to work in an ethical and professional environment (and lay my head on the pillow and sleep peacefully), which at the same time offers companionship and loyalty. The essential, deeply rooted things will be the same, however different they may seem. These are the things that ought to guarantee that Pinheiro Neto will continue to be the best law firm in Brazil for many, many years.

I foresee a greater concern for the environment, a pursuit of alternative sources of energy, growth, economic integration and expanding urbanization in the country. Artificial intelligence will further develop and become more accessible, with reflections in our personal lives and in the labor market. Many of today’s types of jobs and ways of working will vanish. Human labor will likely become increasingly more creative and sophisticated.

In the next 75 years, we shall have a more serious-minded, ethical and committed country, and all our shortcomings shall have been resolved. A country that will be investing in the education of the upcoming generations, prizing correctness and punishing bad practices.

I imagine that the legal environment will have less red tape and be more dynamic. Most likely, the tasks requiring less human intellectual intervention will have been mostly automated. The lawyer will therefore need to have the skills and credentials, good sense and emotional intelligence to perform those tasks no machine can do.

The city will be clean, and garbage will be all treated and recycled. Our rivers will be brought back to life. Ethics will be a basic attribute, no longer serving to set anyone apart.

As artificial intelligence gains ground, I believe there will be databases with studies and statistics related to the success of certain legal stands. I do not believe lawyers or judges will be replaced by robots, but an app or software may be put in place to analyze the likelihood of success in recurrent subjects. This would be useful for lawyers and principally for judges, who will be able to check past rulings from the courts in a more objective manner.

I believe that technology developments will reduce the need of human work, including in legal services. Proof of this is the creation of the “AI lawyer” who analyses millions of files at a fast clip, makes decisions and gives suggestions on how the human lawyer should act in the case in question.

For quite some time now, I have had the honor of playing an active role in the training initiatives of Pinheiro Neto Advogados – a challenging and rewarding task – and, in particular, the launch of our Professional Development Program. Few things compare to the pleasure of witnessing the development of our staff from their first steps as an intern up to becoming a full-fledged equity partner.

Law schools are currently faced with a pressing issue: how to modernize their programs to attract and retain students from the new generations?

Looking ahead, their programs must be adapted to the current needs of legal professionals. The basic subjects must still be there, but students must also learn about the fields of law and areas of practice that have emerged over the last decades, such as digital law and environmental law. The social role of lawyers and pro bono legal work should also be discussed at law schools.

The future of legal practice also calls for full revamp of the teaching methods. There is no longer any room for expository classes where students are not enticed to play an active part in their learning process. Attorneys must be capable of clearly expressing and defending their ideas and opinions.

And how can large firms contribute to this process? I can doubtless say that the work environment should be viewed as a learning and training center acting in association with the school environment, by offering living examples of problems and client needs that interns and young lawyers have an opportunity to tackle. But nothing takes the place of academia as a major venue for intellectual debates.

At our firm, we have an opportunity to invest further in our professionals by providing them with expert knowledge as well as with the requisite skills and abilities to express themselves and put their knowledge into practice, such being ingrained in our firm’s culture. This requires careful mentoring by senior professionals; access to bespoke courses administered in-house; and incentives to engage in master’s degree and foreign associate programs abroad. We make a point of exposing our young lawyers to complex and sophisticated legal issues early on.

Reading what I wrote above, I take even more pride of the role Pinheiro Neto Advogados has long played in the legal community, and which will certainly continue to play in the years ahead: that of being a training ship.

Drawn-out litigation cases will be a thing of the past. All lawyers will study negotiation, mediation and non-violent communication techniques. Collaborative law practice will be the rule.

I joined Pinheiro Neto in 1998, and in the last 19 years have seen constant changes in our practice and, particularly, in our firm. We have repeatedly changed to keep abreast of developments in the outside world. I am certain that we acted as pioneers and spearheads in many of these changes. The changes resulting from technology evolution were staggering. We always were up-to-date on technology in order to continue to provide the best and more efficient services to our clients. However, the most important changes were those related to conduct and behavior. We have an ongoing concern about having the best work environment, encouraging camaraderie, respect and admiration. This environment provides us with the proper balance between work and private interests, helps fight prejudice of all kinds, and addresses the challenges of gender equality, which makes us and our clients proud. I am sure that in the next 75 years we will continue to focus on caring for our most treasured asset: people. And may this stand have effects outside the firm, on the services we provide, and on the perception our clients have of our culture.

Technology advancement will change everything related to the legal world. From the teaching of law to the legal market, with an important influence on communication, on the interaction between persons and on the manner in which they work, as we are already witnessing today. Long-distance teaching, videoconferences, digital proceedings, digital signature. There are already many changes underway and others yet to come, especially in terms of access to knowledge, with a direct impact on the provision of legal services. Today, knowledge is no longer a privilege granted to few. Knowledge will be increasingly accessible to all. This will call for attention to changes and to the new and, particularly, to the need of taking a forwarding-looking approach in order not to be left behind. Good part of the work currently performed by legal professionals will be done by computers, especially as artificial intelligence gains momentum, with computer programs capable of conducting research or preparing contracts or petitions according to certain parameters determined by the user. A great challenge will be to identify the best way of using machines in favor of man.

I believe that creativity will be increasingly important for lawyers to meet clients’ needs in the future. With new technologies, scientific innovations and the digital era, our reality and business environment will be increasingly apart from our legislation, under which changes are difficult to approve and which has a maze of rules, many of them absolutely outdated and obsolete. Within this context, the legal professional will be required to understand the principles governing each field of the law and apply them to the new deals and transactions proposed by clients but not covered or encompassed by current rules. It will be basically like solving a puzzle, and only those professionals who are on a continuous retraining process will succeed in this endeavor.

Pinheiro Neto Advogados will be more than just one of the largest law firms in Latin America to become a professional education venue – The Model Law Practice School.

I believe the whole work flow tends to go paper-free. Today we work only with programmed systems. In the next years we will work with cognitive systems and unstructured data (voice, text, videos, photos and digitalized documents), which will change the way that research, investigations, audits and contract reviews are carried out. I also believe Jurimetrics will be used more often, as it will help measure, for instance, the percentage of decisions issued by the court in a certain direction.

Human relations have changed and will continue to change at a fast pace in the years ahead. Artificial intelligence, virtual communication and networks, mind-blowing technology developments will require the profession – which is built by persons – to reinvent itself. Something that does not divert from its strictly personal nature but is capable of making use of the best innovations.

Our market will face strong international competition. Several players will perish. Intellectual work will increasingly take the spotlight, and there will be no room for repetitive or routine work. In general, legal fees will be lower. Hefty fees will be acceptable only when the client perceives actual gains or value added to the business. Private universities, which are more up-to-date, will distance themselves from public universities, which will lose their status. Students will have more international experience. Brazil will finally end its geographical isolation. I believe new areas in the study and practice of the law will be developed. Specific software will be tasked with due diligence work. We will no longer have one single head office in São Paulo but rather several offices in the city, with meeting rooms spread out in strategic places. Trainees will be required to have international experience and speak foreign languages, which will make competition for a trainee position harder. Diversity will be greater and more easily accepted. We will manage to institutionalize the firm, bringing it in line with international standards. The flexibility of labor laws will allow us to create alternative forms of contracting (part-time, academics as consultants, remote work, etc.). Who knows, the firm may even have active members working in other cities, states or countries?

The legal profession will become even more sophisticated, and only firms which understand this transformation will continue to grow. Technology advances will reduce the need of physical presence at meetings, and litigation procedural acts will all be performed virtually. Home office will be the rule rather than the exception. People will be free to plan their working hours in delivering their work and assignments. Formal dress will be definitively replaced by casual dress.

I believe there will be intense and diversified changes, well beyond what we can even imagine now. These changes will certainly have a strong impact on the way we work and live, but I am certain those working here will be prepared to carry “the firm’s DNA”, so that Pinheiro Neto Advogados may continue to be a stronghold of good legal practices, embracing the best technique in a manner that is socially responsible and committed to its surroundings and community. I quite fancy the idea that we will leave a legacy to Brazilian society through our firm position on the most diverse causes and through our pro bono practice, always in line with the values and principles embraced by the firm throughout the last 75 years.

Our profession will undergo deep changes as technology is increasingly applied to routine activities. Simple and mechanical tasks will be replaced by programs capable of compiling information and writing documents. However, lawyers will always be necessary when it comes to eminently intellectual activities. The physical office space will become irrelevant. The upside will be more flexibility; the downside will be the difficulty in maintaining the same culture and uniformity in our legal services. We will have to worry about international and not only local competitors, which will require focusing on quality and conformity to international levels of excellence. There will be more diversity, as a result of society itself, and formal strictness (in all aspects) will tend to lose ground. The level of specialization seen in law practice in recent years will certainly increase. The business environment will likely be more transparent and ethical, opening room for investments and for social and economic development. The firm has taken an active role in building the country in the last decades, and will most certainly have an important role in the decades to come. Our greatest challenge will be to reinvent ourselves, to adjust to the new reality and maintain an innovative position, which has actually made us one of the most admired law firms in Brazil and worldwide.

Our Pinheiros River will finally have clear waters. Our offices will go back to the downtown area in São Paulo, which will be again the city’s most important corporate area. We will celebrate the 500 partners’ milestone. And 500 female partners! 3D hologram meetings will be commonplace – unfortunately, without cheese balls. Those who are here today will remain together: at the firm’s memorial.

Artificial intelligence will outperform humans in tasks traditionally associated with intellectual skills. Computers will be capable of learning and interpreting an infinite amount of information at an unimaginable speed. The greatest change in the legal market will possibly be the replacement of several roles currently played by lawyers with high performance servers. I dare less in predicting and propose more discussions. Let us think together: will computers be able to resolve conflicts more efficiently? Will the servers interpret the facts and apply tax rules more effectively, with a narrower margin for human interpretation and disputes? Will review of antitrust and environmental matters be replaced by algorithms? Will a law firm comprise legal professionals and physical science professionals? Will we fight for space in the market with legal startups? Or will we join them and follow up closely on this market movement? Is the future of large law firms to be a startup consolidator and integrate the technology solutions with legal expertise? Or will the startups attract all good professionals in the legal market by paying the highest salaries? When should we start investing in research and technology, developing our own systems and algorithms? Who are the right professionals to conduct this process?

75 years from now we will witness a considerable change in the way we work. Employment relations under the strict labor rules currently in force will lose ground to piecework. I am not sure this would work out fine at our firm, but it could perhaps influence how cases are assigned to lawyers. As I see it, this trend is also related to the desire and need for better quality of life and a balance between professional and private life. The piecework mode gives the professional more independence in dealing with his compensation and his agenda.

75 years from now companies will be closer to neighborhoods. Traffic will make fast commuting impossible. In the pursuit for quality of life, working hours will be increasingly flexible, and work from home will be reality in all segments and areas of activity. The media, in partnership with the State, will have to address environmental matters head on so that the population may breathe some quality air. Water saving will become more and more necessary. Another important measure will be the incentives given to companies to move to smaller towns, to regions such as the Northeast, the North and even smaller towns in other large Brazilian states. The city of São Paulo in particular will not be able to provide living conditions for so many people. Increasingly advanced technology – which, while connecting millions of Brazilians, eliminates the simplest relationships, such as a good conversation, the physical presence – will need to be closely observed, and school programs will have to be created to avoid that, in time, people eventually lose the ability to express themselves, even with family members, without the “intermediation” of technology. The tech addiction, which already affects us all, helps explain the emergence of projects such as “log off and get a life.”

A considerable part of legal services will be provided with the assistance of technology, and several tasks currently performed by lawyers will be carried out by machines. The corporate lawyer will act as a trusted business advisor, leaving behind the traditional role of a person who focuses exclusively on legal matters without looking at the bigger picture.

We will live in the culture of everything is possible, where creativity and simplicity will be the great strengths. Diversity will prevail and the world will be composed of millions of different cultural tribes, with different habits, different coexistence rules, and different ethical standards. In my opinion, the concept of globalization will take on a new meaning. The legal market will shift to strictly personal services – the lawyer as the client’s personal advisor and faithful squire. It will be the return of the “family doctor.”

I believe that 75 years from now the firm’s professionals will have different characteristics. The new generation has a greater need to change and to look for new challenges. The current context and career possibilities will need to be adjusted to this dynamic world so that ‘tradition’ may live on in an all-new scenario.

Pinheiro Neto will have new branches. Some of them abroad. The number of lawyers and partners will increase and the head office will move on again to a new and more modern building. Work will be almost paperless as most of it will be performed electronically, especially follow-up on court proceedings. The firm will have more and more a younger spirit without denting its serious commitment to its clients. It may even adopt casual dress throughout the week!

I am sure that law practice will be less formal in the years to come. We will save time and make better use of digital resources, expediting the court relief sought in legal proceedings.

I imagine a future in which legal rules from all countries will tend to harmonize. As to sovereignty, legal systems will converge on multiple points to facilitate business trade. Although not a fostering agent, the law will not be an obstacle to doing business. Technology will be a game changer in terms of legal studies and legal practice. There will be important efficiency gains. Great opportunities will arise as new areas will be created to meet the requirements of a very demanding society when it comes to responsibility, accountability and transparency. Legal studies will be increasingly humanized. The by-the-book approach to the law will give way to reviews more connected to the social and economic context. The rule must make sense not only to the legal scholar but also to the ordinary citizen.

Today information is superficial, aimed at the masses, poorly developed, pondered or discussed. We live in an era of individualism, competition, exclusion, and unenlightened self-interest. It remains to be seen whether these features will be intensified or whether we will have more esprit de corps, altruism, sharing and cooperation in the next 75 years. The law seeks social peace, and peace may be attained by either of two paths: litigation or dialogue. Lawyers must maintain their ability to ponder, consider and test alternatives – to see the other side, to favor dialogue, and to build bridges through reason. A lawyer cannot get involved in “bandwagon effects,” polarization or oversimplification.

There will be much more intolerance for waste of natural resources and for pollution in its many forms. There will be an increase in medical, transportation and data technology. There will be fewer opportunities for less skilled persons and, as a consequence, greater unemployment. In the legal field, greater need for specialization and replacement of many activities by computers and technology. Mass litigation and due diligence will no longer exist.

Global enterprises tend to consolidate under the aegis of international rules. Taxes, businesses and proceedings will dissociate from the countries in which they occur and will be governed by rules (or practices) of a general nature, not guided by the specific legal provisions of each country involved. Companies will be required to know and equally observe such rules, but will have some leeway to create their own control and management routines and procedures. There will be many obstacles ahead, but the firm’s path has been well structured through the incentives to international education given to our professionals. The paradox will be to reconcile the knowledge on international rules and principles with knowledge about the specificities of each company. It seems to me that the profile of law professionals in the decades ahead will be equally complex. Some time ago, the discussion was whether one was a generalist or a specialist. Up to now it has been possible to have professionals with both profiles. The trend, it seems to me, is to have a provider of legal services with comprehensive knowledge of a specific matter. It is unlikely that we will find an Hercules-type lawyer – a litigation lawyer knowledgeable about legal procedure and, depending on the case, about due diligence, capital market, corporate law, arbitration, consumer law, and so on. There will be a trend toward integration of specializations.

Traditional law practice, attached to paper, to physical procedure and to formalism, will tend to disappear. Forms of dispute resolution other than the Judiciary will be more present in the lives of people. We will have instantaneous and impersonal mechanisms for preparation of contracts.

Technology will be at the service of legal businesses, providing more free time and quality of life. We will be pioneers in virtual businesses, high technology, and work from home.

Artificial intelligence will be at the same time a great competitor and a great ally. We live and will live in times where speed is crucial and response time will be increasingly shorter, but by no means at the expense of quality. Human beings will always be an important part of this process.

Technology developments and the speed of events in Brazil and worldwide will make human beings, their sensitiveness and their creativity even more essential for business and for the legal profession.

Women will be granted equal and proportional participation in leadership positions, also as equity partners in law firms.

I believe that new areas of practice related to technology will arise in legal field. Technology will, in fact, guide the workforce.

Technology will not only be a means to make our lives easier. We will have to learn to live with this and get the most out of it. After having been the model of governance among law firms in its first 75 years, the firm will be the model of diversity and inclusion in Brazil and Latin America in the next 75 years.

Society will develop, technology will advance, the climate will change, but the essence will remain intact: human relations will continue to set the tone for everything.

I believe there will be more women holding leadership positions in large law firms.

Brazil will be a more ethical country, finding ways to get around will fall into disuse, and taking advantage of everything will no longer be praised. Society will be transformed, people will be proud of delivering on their promises without losing their good humor and their capacity to adjust to adversities and to react to unforeseen events, inherent characteristics of Brazilian culture.

One of the great challenges for our law firm will be to have our clients and other stakeholders, in Brazil and abroad, realize the value of our members’ intellectual vigor – so that lawyers will remain indispensable, deals may be negotiated and closed, and disputes may be well handled and settled – in a scenario in which artificial intelligence will be a constant and indispensable companion as a working tool. Our people must be able to make high-quality human repertoire prevail and make a difference, otherwise we risk having our work performed by machines. Our values and conduct must have the last 75 years as reference, but we must be prepared to belong to a new time, a new world. I believe our members will have a more diversified profile – their education will be more thorough and their technical training more intense. People that will do their best for the firm, that will be committed and accept responsibility and that, in return, will find here institutional incentive to search for balance between work and personal life. Pinheiro Neto must continue being a place of opportunities, which opens its doors for both personal and intellectual development, a place where the best people and the best professionals will wish to be.

People and demands will change and so will the law practice. Technology will change the dynamics of client-attorney communication in a rather significant way. Competition will be fiercer because information will be public and accessible. What will not change is that complex cases will still need qualified people. The challenge will be to attract and retain such people. Therefore, our policies for Human Resources will be more flexible, and managerial models will be further developed. Our challenge will be to keep union and teamwork.

Areas such as transport, agriculture, communication, and energy will be safer and more efficient. Medicine will find a solution for several chronic diseases. The environment will be handled in a responsible and balanced way. The world will be more integrated and less unequal. Brazil will be able to develop its economic potential and achieve a very high level of justice and social balance in the next 75 years. The country will achieve meaningful strategic importance. The population, in general, will be much better educated and prepared. With more equity, people will be less consumerist and more spiritualized. Interpersonal relationships will be less hostile, friendlier, with wholehearted cooperation. Legal issues will be more and more complex, and the practice niches will be increasingly better defined. Law firms will no longer demand large physical spaces. Remote work will gain momentum. Investments in technology and standardization of procedures will be intensified. Manpower will be much more qualified. Only a handful of law firms will be successful, and competition will be fierce. The great challenge will be to generate quality employments that ensure people personal fulfillment and dependability.

In the next 75 years, a lot of what we currently do will be performed by computers. Our challenge will be to keep on top of what will be difficult for computers to accomplish. Things involving human interaction. Maybe our team will not have as many lawyers, but they will all be technically flawless and feel completely at ease in the business environment. New practice areas will come up, while others will fade away. Let the next 75 years come!

Relations between people will suffer a major change in the next years. Nowadays, we must observe, accept and absorb the changes that technology is imposing on us. On the other hand, this same technology shows, on a daily basis, how much it can help us lead a better life. In my area of legal practice, life sciences, we discuss the innovations that will shape the future. I like to think that, thanks to our work at Pinheiro Neto Advogados, it will be common place for us to talk, in 2092, about a cure for cancer, Alzheimer and chronic diseases.

In the law field, there will be less tolerance for swindles, doubtful clauses and malicious prosecution. Business will be more sophisticated, demanding bespoke multidisciplinary teams. In the production scenario, more developed machines and processes will greatly reduce the demand for low skilled labor – in agriculture, industry and in services. Unemployment will rise and such demand for overspecialization will work against reduction in social inequalities. Sectors and industries that once believed to be fundamental will be put to the test. The automobile industry will lose importance and give way to alternative means of transport. Banks as we know today will have to reinvent themselves to compete with fintechs and e-payment mechanisms. Objects that we currently see as essential will become museum pieces (books, keyboards, hook phones, wristwatches, glasses, etc.). Human relations will change as they become more dependent on social medias; and perceptions, which used to be purely sensorial, will also be adapted to the virtual world.

The regulatory scenario will grow increasingly complex to cope with social demands, resulting in the need for more expertise and differentiation in the services rendered. The simpler jobs are doomed to disappear and might be replaced by technology innovations. Law firms will compete not only between themselves but also with other types of services and platforms.

Communications will be faster and decisions, maybe, less pondered. Friendlier mechanisms to solve disputes will be common. In Brazil, justice will be faster and grounded on court precedents. Society will be more sensitive to others, to the environment and to differences. We will see the sovereignty of ethics, influenced by more efficient mechanisms to control corruption. Legal studies will be increasingly global. Exchange programs will be mandatory in school curricula. Women and men will share the work market equally. Our profession will be more valued and legal services will be an accessible tool for citizenship.

The law market will be more challenging and sophisticated. Clients will be more dynamic and demanding. The subject matters under our care will be more complex and multifaceted. Our lawyers and trainees will have higher aspirations and greater expectations. We will have to adjust to such changes without giving up our values and ideals. They have brought us here and will help us face the challenges and opportunities in the next 75 years.

Fintechs have revolutionized the financial system and paved a road of no return for banks that are willing to remain competitive in the future. They are showing the banking industry that the ‘one size fits all’ approach must be changed. Clients have steadily moved into the spotlight – products and services are now to adapt to their needs.

The challenge of large banking institutions is to adapt their business model if they want to live up to this new technology-driven reality. Competition increasingly comes from all sides, as clients are now setting the rules.

Blockchain technology, for instance, has raised ongoing concerns about the need of elements that would make day-to-day transactions more trustworthy, such as client and transaction records, or full-fledged fund transfer mechanisms. Such technology has been extensively tested for issuance of cryptocurrencies, so the trend is that it will be increasingly adopted in the banking system, whose transactions and operations will be faster, safer and cheaper.

In this digital age, we will see less physical branches (or none at all), and Brazilians being increasingly ‘bankarized’.

We will no longer ‘go to’ a bank for our financial services, as it will instead start working as a portal where several service providers will be acting under one same umbrella. By doing so, banks will be able to concentrate their efforts on their strengths, leaving secondary services to their business partners.

And for those asking me whether paper money and coins will exist, I would recommend detachment. Minting coins and printing paper money is expensive, and so is keeping them safe; it seems that they will soon be just a memory.

Legal services will be more objective and dynamic. There will be no room for lack of objectivity. Law firms will be required to have structures that are quickly adapted to society’s changes. Large law firms will be tasked with mass work, increasingly computerized and standardized. Smaller ones will focus on specialized services for clients willing to pay for creativity and imagination, which are notedly responsible for economic transformation. Remote work will take pride of place because of technology developments and the high cost of physical facilities. The members of large law firms will be young people and they will probably retire at the age of 50 to 55, because succession of individuals will be fast as increasingly qualified professionals join the market. Legal education will be better, closer connected to reality and taught in a less theoretical way.

Technology will increase our productivity, letting us even more connected. On the other hand, it will create new types of competitors. We will need to specialize even more to deliver top-level counseling to our clients. The working environment will be different. Horizontal structures will leave room for greater exchange of ideas and innovation.

When thinking about our law firm in the next 75 years, one of the main aspects that comes to my mind is the matter of knowledge.

Knowledge is – in essence – one of the main factors that have brought us here. Knowledge is the quality for which we are known and that serves as pillar for the other attributes of support and sustenance, such as ethics, assertive communication, engagement in the cases, the open and aboveboard dealing with clients and peers, among others. These are all qualities that highlight and support our culture. I do not intend to address all of them, but only knowledge.

In the last 75 years, we have evolved from knowledge management based on records of our hands-on experience and analyses, all of which were kept in folders at the library. It was perhaps the richest part of the library itself in that it synthesized the firm’s problem-solving knowledge and strategies. I recall being there for hours reading, with great curiosity, the yellow copies of memos written by seasoned partners about cases solved, matters discussed or under discussion. The research memos were very important for sure, but the memos reporting how the cases had been solved and the solutions found for factual scenarios were the most precious ones, because they reflected the very raison d’être of the firm, which is not to be an academic powerhouse (although we may even make our contributions) but rather to produce the knowledge necessary for solving factual problems brought by our clients or, ultimately, by society, with regard to corporate law in its broadest sense.

It is obvious that technology invaded and stirred up such system of recording knowledge and experiences. The output is very fast, cases are many and varied, the recording itself is erratic. Even if they were all there, consulting such records would be difficult because the dynamics of current times does not allow for long consultations carried out standing in the library. Other times, a long time ago. This certainly poses challenges for the next 75 years.

The path I see is to increasingly invest our time and efforts in “tacit knowledge”, i.e., knowledge that has not been obtained formally, in a systematized way, by means of classic studies and graduation and post-graduation law courses, but rather built as a result of experiences lived along one’s life. During its first 75 years, the firm has built a great deal of tacit knowledge. I believe this is precisely our most valuable asset. It is said that tacit knowledge is what lies below the waterline, should it be an iceberg. The metaphor is valid. It is the kind of knowledge that is only obtainable by scrutinizing, inquiring, asking, so that the holders of a living experience may share their unique knowledge in light of the facts at issue – considering their nuances and differences.

The tacit knowledge of our firm comprises not only the one held by each one of its members; it is also formed of the sum of the experiences and memories lived jointly, in so many cases. The most brilliant insights have certainly come from bringing distinct experts together. This is how we have made a difference and stood out. Therefore, the question is how can we keep on extracting the best that the members of Pinheiro Neto, as a group, can offer, in terms of added tacit knowledge, so as to solve the complex issues entrusted to us? I have no doubt that the answer lies in greater cooperation and interaction among the members.

The next 75 years will be marked less by the brilliance of a single lawyer than by the strength of the team he or she belongs to, because knowledge can no longer be monopolized – whether by quantity or by the specialty of a subject. The level of growing complexity in several practice areas since the 1990s is overwhelming. Because nobody will know everything, experts in corporate law will have to interact with the antitrust peers, who will need to understand the issues regarding environmental law, which in turn will depend on the concepts of financial law, which cannot be practiced without tax law, thus generating the need to create permanent networks of knowledge sharing. This will have to be done not only on a case-by-case basis, but forums inside the firm will have to be encouraged, interaction and companionship spaces promoted, to allow more spontaneity aimed at the exchange of knowledge so that solutions may arise not only as a response to the needs and specificities of a case, but may happen at any time.

Think over the spaces to accomplish that. Think over the teams. Think over the meetings. Even more participation,
more discussion, more multidisciplinarity, more interaction, more cooperation.

The future will tell, but these are some issues we must tackle to keep alive, for the next 75 years, this jewel – tacit knowledge –, which is one of the main qualities that support Pinheiro Neto Advogados.

I dare not foresee how our physical space will be like, or even if we will need some physical space at all. I believe the changes brought about by technology will be so profound that it is practically impossible to predict how our profession will be practiced. I do however have two unshakeable convictions: Brazil will be – definitively and inexorably – a major player in the world scenario; and Pinheiro Neto will remain being the best law firm in Brazil (and one of the best in the world), provided that it keeps its policy of investing and believing in the best people, reinforcing the belief in those values that have guided us thus far.

Technology innovations will set the pace of change throughout the world. The next 75 years will bring about drastic changes in the way human and economic relations work, with an increasingly greater role being played by artificial intelligence in every aspect of our daily lives, which will probably have an impact as well on the way we conduct legal work. In this context, it seems to me that our challenge is to stay at the forefront of the change process while also preserving the solid culture that has shaped us and now identifies us as a unique institution. I am sure we are going to make it!

We encourage our team to look further
ahead and think about the changes that the
next 75 years will bring to law, legal practice,
and the business environment. We invite you to
browse through these 75 selected thoughts.

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  • RENÊ G. S. MEDRADO CLONE
    RENÊ G. S. MEDRADO CLONE Partner With us since 1995
  • ALEXANDRE BERTOLDI CLONE
    ALEXANDRE BERTOLDI CLONE Managing Partner With us since 1982
  • JORGE N. F. LOPES JUNIOR
    JORGE N. F. LOPES JUNIOR Partner With us since 2000
  • MAURO BERENHOLC
    MAURO BERENHOLC Partner With us since 1988
  • MÁRCIA L. B. GIRALDO
    MÁRCIA L. B. GIRALDO Finances With us since 2001
  • MARÍLIA DE CARA
    MARÍLIA DE CARA Associate With us since 2004
  • RODRIGO PERSONE P. CAMARGO
    RODRIGO PERSONE P. CAMARGO Partner With us since 1996
  • ANTONIO MARTINS
    ANTONIO MARTINS Paralegal With us since 1990
  • CARLOS HENRIQUE TRANJAN BECHARA
    CARLOS HENRIQUE TRANJAN BECHARA Partner With us since 1990
  • JOÃO MARCELO PACHECO
    JOÃO MARCELO PACHECO Partner With us since 1998
  • CAIO FERREIRA SILVA
    CAIO FERREIRA SILVA Partner With us since 2001
  • LIGIA SAFRA
    LIGIA SAFRA Associate With us since 2011
  • TÉRCIO CHIAVASSA
    TÉRCIO CHIAVASSA Partner With us since 1993
  • BEATRIZ ARAUJO PYRRHO
    BEATRIZ ARAUJO PYRRHO Associate With us since 2014
  • DIÓGENES GONÇALVES
    DIÓGENES GONÇALVES Partner With us since 1992
  • JOSÉ LUIZ HOMEM DE MELLO
    JOSÉ LUIZ HOMEM DE MELLO Partner With us since 1992
  • FERNANDO MIRANDEZ DEL NERO GOMES
    FERNANDO MIRANDEZ DEL NERO GOMES Partner With us since 2002
  • RICARDO BINNIE
    RICARDO BINNIE Associate With us since 2003
  • ANDRESSA BENEDETTI
    ANDRESSA BENEDETTI Associate With us since 2015
  • FRANCO MUSETTI GROTTI
    FRANCO MUSETTI GROTTI Partner With us since 1995
  • JOSÉ CARLOS JUNQUEIRA SAMPAIO MEIRELLES
    JOSÉ CARLOS JUNQUEIRA SAMPAIO MEIRELLES Partner With us since 1984
  • PEDRO PAULO BARRADAS BARATA
    PEDRO PAULO BARRADAS BARATA Partner With us since 2000
  • MARCELLO BERNARDES
    MARCELLO BERNARDES Partner With us since 1984
  • TATIANA DRATOVSKY SISTER
    TATIANA DRATOVSKY SISTER Associate With us since 2002
  • SÉRGIO AUGUSTO GODINES
    SÉRGIO AUGUSTO GODINES Human Resources With us since 1997
  • LUCIANA MAYUMI SAKAMOTO
    LUCIANA MAYUMI SAKAMOTO Associate With us since 2006
  • VICTOR MACENA
    VICTOR MACENA Intern With us since 2016
  • RAPHAEL DE CUNTO
    RAPHAEL DE CUNTO Partner With us since 1984
  • ANNA THEREZA MONTEIRO DE BARROS
    ANNA THEREZA MONTEIRO DE BARROS Partner With us since 1994
  • FERNANDO ZORZO
    FERNANDO ZORZO Partner With us since 1998
  • ANTONIO MORELLO
    ANTONIO MORELLO Partner With us since 1986
  • KAREN SCHIAVON
    KAREN SCHIAVON Associate With us since 2000
  • MARGARETE BUZO
    MARGARETE BUZO Secretary With us since 2001
  • ROSELIANE ANDRADE
    ROSELIANE ANDRADE Information Technology With us since 2010
  • CRISTIANNE ZARZUR
    CRISTIANNE ZARZUR Partner With us since 1992
  • LUCIANO GARCIA ROSSI
    LUCIANO GARCIA ROSSI Partner With us since 1991
  • RODRIGO MARTONE
    RODRIGO MARTONE Partner With us since 1999
  • MARCOS CHAVES LADEIRA
    MARCOS CHAVES LADEIRA Partner With us since 1985
  • JOSÉ MAURO MACHADO
    JOSÉ MAURO MACHADO Partner With us since 1997
  • MARCELO AVANCINI NETO
    MARCELO AVANCINI NETO Partner With us since 1983
  • TIAGO MOREIRA VIEIRA ROCHA
    TIAGO MOREIRA VIEIRA ROCHA Associado With us since 2005
  • NATASHA GOLIK
    NATASHA GOLIK Human Resources With us since 2015
  • MARIA APARECIDA ELIAS DA SILVA
    MARIA APARECIDA ELIAS DA SILVA Finances With us since 2014
  • FRANCISCO WERNECK MARANHÃO
    FRANCISCO WERNECK MARANHÃO Partner With us since 1996
  • ANTONIO JOSÉ L.C. MONTEIRO
    ANTONIO JOSÉ L.C. MONTEIRO Partner With us since 1979
  • GABRIELLA COCIOLITO GARCIA
    GABRIELLA COCIOLITO GARCIA Associate With us since 2013
  • IVAN THIBES
    IVAN THIBES Paralegal With us since 1994
  • GABRIELA CAVAZANI
    GABRIELA CAVAZANI Associate With us since 2012
  • MARCELO MARQUES RONCAGLIA
    MARCELO MARQUES RONCAGLIA Partner With us since 1995
  • MARCELLO LOBO
    MARCELLO LOBO Partner With us since 1998
  • ALEXANDRE OUTEDA JORGE
    ALEXANDRE OUTEDA JORGE Partner With us since 1997
  • JOÃO LUÍS A. DE MEDEIROS
    JOÃO LUÍS A. DE MEDEIROS Partner With us since 1984
  • EDUARDO CARVALHO CAIUBY
    EDUARDO CARVALHO CAIUBY Partner With us since 1988
  • LUCIANA ROSANOVA GALHARDO
    LUCIANA ROSANOVA GALHARDO Partner With us since 1989
  • TIAGO THEMUDO LESSA
    TIAGO THEMUDO LESSA Partner With us since 1997
  • ADRIANO DRUMMOND CANÇADO TRINDADE
    ADRIANO DRUMMOND CANÇADO TRINDADE Counsel With us since 1995
  • THAÍS FONTES DRUMOND
    THAÍS FONTES DRUMOND Associate With us since 2013
  • LUANA MAGALHÃES POLÓNIA
    LUANA MAGALHÃES POLÓNIA Secretary With us since 2017
  • EDUARDO PAOLIELLO
    EDUARDO PAOLIELLO Partner With us since 2000
  • LUCAS SIMÃO
    LUCAS SIMÃO Associate With us since 2004
  • JANAINA CAMPOS MESQUITA VAZ
    JANAINA CAMPOS MESQUITA VAZ Associate With us since 2012
  • LUIZ FERNANDO PAIVA
    LUIZ FERNANDO PAIVA Partner With us since 1990
  • HENRY SZTUTMAN
    HENRY SZTUTMAN Partner With us since 1990
  • GIANCARLO MATARAZZO
    GIANCARLO MATARAZZO Partner With us since 1997
  • FERNANDO ALVES MEIRA
    FERNANDO ALVES MEIRA Partner With us since 1989
  • MARCELO VIVEIROS DE MOURA
    MARCELO VIVEIROS DE MOURA Partner With us since 1985
  • ANGELA KUNG
    ANGELA KUNG Partner With us since 1989
  • RODRIGO DE MAGALHÃES CARNEIRO DE OLIVEIRA
    RODRIGO DE MAGALHÃES CARNEIRO DE OLIVEIRA Partner With us since 1982
  • ANDRÉ VIVAN DE SOUZA
    ANDRÉ VIVAN DE SOUZA Partner With us since 2000
  • SÉRGIO FARINA FILHO
    SÉRGIO FARINA FILHO Partner With us since 1981
  • GUILHERME LEITE
    GUILHERME LEITE Partner With us since 1994
  • BRUNO BALDUCCINI
    BRUNO BALDUCCINI Partner With us since 1991
  • FERNANDO RUIZ DE ALMEIDA PRADO
    FERNANDO RUIZ DE ALMEIDA PRADO Partner With us since 1986
  • GUILHERME SAMPAIO MONTEIRO
    GUILHERME SAMPAIO MONTEIRO Partner With us since 2001
  • RENÊ G. S. MEDRADO
    RENÊ G. S. MEDRADO Partner With us since 1995
  • ALEXANDRE BERTOLDI
    ALEXANDRE BERTOLDI Managing Partner With us since 1982
  • JORGE N. F. LOPES JUNIOR CLONE
    JORGE N. F. LOPES JUNIOR CLONE Partner With us since 2000
  • MAURO BERENHOLC CLONE
    MAURO BERENHOLC CLONE Partner With us since 1988
  • Leonardo Rocha e Silva
    Leonardo Rocha e Silva Partner With us since 1994

visions ofthe future

We encourage our team to look further ahead and
think about the changes that the next 75 years will
bring to law, legal practice, and the business environment.
We invite you to browse through these 75 selected thoughts.

We are ready to take on the next 75 years